The Golden Compass

OK, so it doesn’t take much to get me excited about a movie from the previews. I really am a trailer whore, so it is no wonder that two armored polar bears fighting had me all ready to go watch this movie. But then the emails start coming in about how they are written by an atheist and that this movie is like the atheist version of marijuana (a gateway drug). So now I feel all bad for wanting to go and see it.

But that got me to thinking. What would have happened if the internet had been around when The Wizard of Oz came out? That wasn’t written from a Christian perspective.  There are people who have similar objections to Dorothy and Toto as they do to Harry Potter (don’t get me started on that). You have witches and magic and a eastern “there is power within you” philosophy. Add that to the whole idea that the “great and powerful one” is actually just a man who can fake it well and you have a movie that Christians can get up in arms against.

So I say again, what would have happened if that movie had come out now. There would have been email chains and boycotts and Christians refusing to let their kids see such propaganda. You never know we may have never experienced those great days back before cable when that movie would come on once a year and you would watch through the whole black and white part just for that glorious moment when she opens the door and her world is in color.

I don’t really have a huge point to make here. I don’t know if The Golden Compass is a movie Christians should see (although there are some really cool polar bears in there), but I think somewhere along the way Christians have started defining themselves by what they stand against and have forgotten what they stand for.

But that is what I have been saying for years so I won’t go off on that rant again.  

8 thoughts on “The Golden Compass

  1. Diana F says:

    I agree totally with the "forgotten what they stand for"! It is important to stand up and tell who you are and who you love! I love Jesus – and I stood up at church, work, home and told everyone! It’s a great feeling.

  2. Leslie says:

    Here’s a good rundown of why the movie is something Christians should think twice about letting their kids see it. But I think a discerning adult should watch it and decide for himself.

    I am glad to have received the email, because as a mother of 4 I always find out the worldview of a movie before I take my kids to see it. Sometimes it is manageable and would lead to a discussion worth having– other times it is not worth exposing them to. We see alot of movies, but we also bypass alot.

    ~Leslie

  3. Leslie says:

    Oops the link didn’t work for the "here’s:

    http://www.christianitytoday.com/movies/commentaries/fearnotthecompass.html

    [editor: In my browser the address gets cut off. If you can’t see the end it should be fearnotthecompass.html]

  4. Jen says:

    If you just received an email about the movie, feel lucky. I have been receiving these emails for about 4 months now and I am so tired of them. I went and read the books. I had never even heard of it before, but I couldn’t understand why people were so afraid of a movie.

    I don’t think it’s that big a deal. I do think it is something that is beyond kids. One of the main points of the books (and Pullman expounds on this in several interviews) is that Heaven should be viewed as a Republic rather than a Kingdom. People’s attitude’s and judgments are skewed when they latch onto Kingdom imagery. And he feels that when the church gets involved in controlling government both are corrupted. I think he has a point on both accounts and I could see that in the story, but I don’t think anyone under 13 has a chance.

    As with all things labeled bad, there are good redeeming qualities too. Lyra’s love and loyalty and her and Will’s ultimate sacrifice at the end of the trilogy are beautiful examples of loving your neighbor as yourself (better than yourself).

    I still just want to say to those who are sending around these emails without knowing anything about the books or movie, why isn’t your faith stronger than a movie? What are you so afraid of? I do agree that parents should be involved if their kids are seeing this to help them understand the underlying themes of the books (hint: it’s not really about killing God). And the movie is rated PG-13. That should be respected.

    Think about all the great movies and literature we would have to miss out on if we only read "Christian" authors. How sad! How incredibly limited we would be!

  5. kelsey c says:

    well the author does say he " kills G-d in the end"

  6. jose says:

    Which god I wonder? A false one, an idol? Is it the god who is capricious and seeks those who will oppress others in his name? Because that god should be killed.

  7. Bren says:

    I am not certain about all the aspects of the movie, I know the little girls quest to get and use the golden compass is said to entail demons that speak and know of the children’s future and tell them of their future…which is a little strange to me, and that in the end God is killed…well….Christ is killed in the Bible…although he rises again…maybe this might happen in a sequel…j/k but really I don’t know alot about this book, I do know kids latch on to anything they read and many books can cause an impressionable child to latch on to things they should not be interrested in, aka witchcraft and tarot cards and the like…however an intelligent child should know right from wrong and I’m not certain that "abstinence" in the sense of sensorship of all literature is the right way to go. Ultimately you need to know your child, understand boundaries that may be neccesary or may not be neccesary and go from there.

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